An in depth analysis of the modern world silent killer hypertension

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An in depth analysis of the modern world silent killer hypertension

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Syrian government artillery damaged a ambulance in the province of Daraa. Syrian Network For Human Rights NEW YORK — Since the start of the Syrian conflict inhundreds of medical personnel have been killed, ambulances have come under fire and pharmacies have been destroyed, creating a nationwide healthcare crisis.

For Syrians living with chronic diseases such as diabetes, asthma, cancer and kidney and heart diseases — long-lasting conditions that can often be managed but not cured — living in war-torn Syria means not only coping with bombs and bullets, but also the additional burden of their unmanaged symptoms.

Worsening health conditions in Syria have also allowed for the resurgence of life-threatening illnesses that had largely been eradicated. If not treated, many of these chronic illnesses can result in dangerous complications, and in some cases, death. Globally, chronic diseases are the leading causes of mortalityresponsible for around 60 percent of all deaths worldwide.

Cardiovascular diseases are the biggest killer, followed by cancer, respiratory disease and diabetes. Before the start of the conflict, Syria was a middle-income country with a functioning and comprehensive health system, burdened with its own share of chronic diseases, similar in magnitude to that of the United States — inheart disease accounted for 35 percent of all early deaths in the U.

Bachir, who asked that his full name not be used for security reasons, continued: A lot of medical students are working as physicians, there is a lack of protocols, there is a lack of a safe environment to work. But those who do brave the danger of visiting a medical facility are often met with additional obstacles.

Many life-saving medications for those suffering from a chronic illness are no longer available in northern Syria.

Critical diagnostic services are also lacking. In Aleppo and Idlib, outside government control, just three CT scanners are available to serve 4 million to 5 million people.

Medical supplies are routinely removed from aid convoys, on the infrequent occasions when requests to deliver assistance are approved by the Syrian authorities. Inthe World Health Organization submitted 21 requests to the Syrian government for permission to deliver medical supplies to 82 locations, according to the U.

Only five requests had been approved. One of the most gaping holes is the lack of insulin, the main medication to treat type 1 diabetes, which mainly affects children, Bachir said. Roughly 60 percent of Syrians who are insulin-dependent are at risk due to lack of supplies, according to WHO.

Aid agencies and independent NGOs have made only a small dent in treatment for those with renal disease. Although exact figures are lacking, the United Nations aimed to reach around 5, dialysis patients in Talbiseh has lacked basic medical supplies for too long.

Oussama Rifai, a Syrian-American physician specializing in kidney disease and dialysis. Rifai established a network of experts within and outside Syria to provide real-time consultations and advice to medical personnel serving dialysis patients. Still, many patients have lost their lives because of lack of access to dialysis.

Diabetes was on the rise in Syria before the war, but war conditions in the country have made this disease, and several others, increasingly rampant. Since the conflict began, more than 4 million people have left Syria, many crossing the border into neighboring Jordan.

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The clinic is seeing around new patients per month. Diabetes and hypertension are among the most common conditions Ahmed has seen at the clinic. But with so many other pressing needs for refugees — the high cost of living, providing food and other expenses — patients themselves neglect the disease, said Ahmed.Bio.

Dr. Utz directs a highly-successful lab of scientists at Stanford University School of Medicine. The lab focuses on the normal immune system and how it differs from the immune system of patients with immunodeficiency disorders, infections, and autoimmune diseases.

Bad habits of ‘Western lifestyle’ blamed for rise of cancer in the developing world. Spectator Health reporter. Is ‘modern life’ to blame for a rise in cancer among children? Also it takes years of in depth study to gain a PhD. Perhaps we shouldn’t make sweeping and arrogant generalisations that a doctor of medicine knows more.

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elle save 90% subscribe give a gift visit the website customer service. elle decor. In , the World Health Organization submitted 21 requests to the Syrian government for permission to deliver medical supplies to 82 locations, according to the U.N.

secretary-general’s May report to the Security Council. Only five requests had been approved. Jul 19,  · Modern Scientific Controversies Part 3: The War on Sugar.

with the exception of my concern for the extent of the harm that these modern scientific controversies do to the reputation of science.

An in depth analysis of the modern world silent killer hypertension

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